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Vancouver Sun newspapers online 1912-2018 FREE for in-house use at the VPL (Vancouver Public Libray)

Last week I reported that the Vancouver Sun newspaper is now searchable online within the Ancestry digital resource of the VPL for the date range 1912-2018.

folded newspapers
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

This way to search will shave hours off your research time plus give you easy access to news stories that might whet your appetite and inspire you to to write a story, make a movie, paint a picture, or just have fun exploring the antics you humans get into.

It sure beats locating, loading, scrolling, and unloading rolls of microfilm that can eat up lots of time with sometimes negligible results.

This new database allows you to search by keyword, title, news-reporter, or date and to narrow it by country, province, city, and individual newspaper – of which there are hundreds.

If you’re looking for stories from the Vancouver Sun specifically you’ll need to narrow your search by choosing country (Canada); province (British Columbia); city (Vancouver); and finally, newspaper (Vancouver Sun).

Or you search within one  entire newspaper from one a particular day or date-range, or by date-range followed by keyword search within that range.

You can also select any number of newspapers to do a simultaneous search in multiple newspapers anytime or for a specific date-range.

Like any kind of searchable database, there are usually multiple ways to search and you’ll probably find your favourite if you do enough searches and within a short enough  period of time to get it into your head.

I always find it easiest to have a search in mind before I go through a new database. It makes it less vague and probably more useful in the long-run. Here are my steps:

  • Go through each tab on the database’s interface page (what you see on your screen which is a user-friendly rendition of the back-end of the database) and see what options they provide; also any sidebars
  • Keep track of how I do my searches, making hand-written notes on a sheet of paper at each step so I don’t get lost or forget what I’ve done
  • Assess the value of those steps for the type of search I’m doing and adjust/go back/keep as appropriate.

It’s sometimes tempting to get lots of results but if 99% of them are no good you just end up spending time combing through and eliminating them.  Better to get fewer, more specific results than hundreds of useless ones.

Unless you’re just browsing for ideas …….

I did a search for a column I wrote for the Sun  in 1997 which I’d couldn’t find in my paper files anymore.  First I narrowed my search to the Vancouver Sun, then to the date I knew it was published, and finally I did a keyword search within those parameters, and it came up nice ‘n easy.

I’ve just added it to my “Clippings” file that is part of the Ancestry site you might find useful.

If you want to try out online searches from your home or office there is a 7-day free trial after which you have to start paying $74.90 for six months, unless you cancel your free trial before it ends.  So write on your calendar when you need to cancel the free trial if you don’t want to be charged. This is the only way to access it from home after your free trial ends.

But if you can get into any branch  of the Vancouver Public Library, you can get free access to it through the Ancestor digital resource.  Check with a librarian for any help getting into it.

I imagine it’s the same with most public libraries but call your first to be sure.

And would you leave a comment if you get free access to it at another library or your experience using this resource so we can all learn?

Thanks!